SMART Goals Introduction

by ryan on December 13, 2017




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SMART Goals Introduction

 

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Introduction to SMART Goals – a brief video post that answers the question: What are SMART Goals?

The transcript, below, defines each SMART Goal characteristic.

VIDEO:




– Slide 1 –

Introduction to SMART Goals

Hi there, and welcome. My name is Tom Warneke, the Author of How to Define SMART Goals. This is a short video to introduce you to SMART Goals. Please subscribe to this YouTube channel and return for future episodes that will explain the benefits and provide more information about how to set SMART goals for yourself.

– Slide 2 –

What are SMART Goals?

SMART is an acronym used to describe the characteristics of well-defined goals. You may have seen a definition for SMART goals before; if so, this will be a little different. If this is a new concept for you, then please realize that other people you talk to about SMART goals might have a slightly different perspective than what is presented here. The characteristics of SMART goals are:

printable-paper-template-goals-worksheet-goal-setting-worksheet-2

Specific – The details you give in identifying the goal

Metrics – The measurements you use to define your goal and monitor your progress

Attainable and Actions – The steps you take to attain a reasonable goal

Reward – How you benefit by achieving the goal

Target Date – The date you set to achieve the goal

Now let’s dig into the meaning of each of the five SMART goal characteristics in more detail.

– Slide 3 –

Specific – The details you give in identifying the goal

• Be very specific about what you want to achieve
• Put it in “end-state” terms–Think of how you will express having accomplished the goal once you have achieved it.

Be very specific about what you want to achieve, and put it in “end-state” terms. Think of how you will express having accomplished the goal once you have achieved it. For example, you might have the goal “to lose weight.” If asked to get more specific, you might say, “My goal is to lose twenty pounds.” That is better, but to put it in end-state terms, you could express your goal as “My goal is to achieve a target weight of 180 pounds.”

– Slide 4 –

Metrics – The measurements you use to define the goal and monitor progress

•Define how much you want to accomplish
•Indicate how you will measure your progress

Metrics define the quantity, or how much. Quantify your SMART goals in measurable terms so there is no ambiguity about what you are trying to accomplish and whether you have achieved it.

You also need to define how you are going to monitor your progress. Being able to measure incremental progress provides feedback on whether your actions are effective, and it gives you a sense of achievement to see the progress you are making toward your goal.

Using our target weight example, 180 pounds is clearly measurable. To satisfy the monitoring aspect, you might decide that a reduction of five pounds per week is reasonable. So, your SMART goal evolves to “My goal is to achieve a target weight of 180 pounds. I’ll monitor progress weekly, and I have a target reduction rate of five pounds per week.”

– Slide 5 –

Attainable and Actions – The steps you take to attain a reasonable goal

• Set attainable goals
• Actions define how you plan to achieve your goal

“A” has a double meaning. ,,, First, set attainable goals—there is no sense in setting goals that you have no hope of achieving. It’s okay to set the bar high, but don’t set yourself up for failure and frustration.

Actions define how you plan to achieve your goal—the strategy and plan you will use to accomplish what you need to do. It might be a simple set of guidelines or a sequence of steps that make up a plan. Longer-term or more difficult goals may list a series of subgoals that you establish and track individually.

Continuing with our target weight example, five pounds per week may be too aggressive. A reduction rate of one pound per week is probably more realistic.

An important point to make at this time is, as you think about and formulate the details of your SMART goals, you may need to adjust your initial assumptions. With the noted adjustments, our goal now reads, “My goal is to achieve a target weight of 180 pounds. I’ll monitor progress weekly, and I have a target reduction rate of one pound per week.” Confidently and with specificity in mind, you record your actions as: 1) Eat a balanced diet of no more than 1,700 calories per day; 2) Exercise every day by walking or engaging in other activities that burn at least 300 calories.

– Slide 6 –

Reward – How you benefit by achieving the goal

• This is why you want to achieve your goal
• It is the sense of fulfillment and the benefit you will
realize when you complete it.
• Consider a goal’s value
• Consider opportunity costs

The Rewardis why you want to achieve your goal. It is the sense of fulfillment and the benefit you will realize when you complete it. You aren’t going to put forth a lot of effort trying to achieve something that doesn’t provide a sufficient return, so reflect early about what is motivating you and what you expect to get from achieving your goal. Consider a goal’s value while accounting for both the trade-offs with other goals and how you will spend your finite time and energy.

Achieving our target weight, for example, provides feelings of strength and vigor, potential for longer life, and lower health care costs. That’s worth striving for!

– Slide 7 –

Target Date – The date you set to achieve the goal

• The target date provides when you are to achieve your goal.
• You can look forward to when you will receive the reward
• A date grounds your goal in reality

What is always coming and never arrives? Tomorrow! A goal with a specific date sets a deadline that will add a sense of urgency. The target date provides when you are to achieve your goal. With that date firmly in mind, you can look forward to the time you will receive the reward of achieving your goal. A date grounds your goal in reality, and it makes you rationalize your action plan in accordance with that date.

– Slide 8 –

Now you know what SMART Goals are!

Now you know what a SMART Goal is: It is Specific, stated in “end state” terms; it is measurable so you know when it is achieved and you can monitor progress; it is Attainable and you have an action plan; it is rewarding and beneficial once achieved, and you have a target date to achieve the goal.

– Slide 9 & Slide 10 –

I hope you found this video helpful, and if so, please share it with your friends using the icons below. Thank you for watching and have a great day!

Sample SMART Sheets:

printable-paper-template-goal-settings-ideas-on-pinterest-personal-development-download




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